Unwanted gifts needed in Suffolk

Published

Suffolk's waste team is urging people to stop and think before discarding undesired Christmas gifts this January.

Clothes, DVDs, books, toiletries and many household items need not go anywhere near the bin - instead they could be donated to local charity shops across the county.

The Ipswich Carr Street Oxfam shop deals mainly in books and other media but will accept all items for reuse which they can pass on to other stores.

Shop manager Richard Webb said;

"When the book banks are emptied every fortnight we receive approximately 3000 books, around half of which are good for resale and the rest are recycled. This week we expect to see an abundance of children's books from the post Christmas clear out.

“Donations slow up in December, when people have got Christmas on their minds, but they are beginning to pick up again. We rely completely on these donated items to raise money for our good causes."

An alternative option is to visit websites such as ‘Freecycle’ and ‘Freegle’. These sites feature groups of online local communities who encourage people to give and take items rather than throw them away, with no money changing hands.

These online groups are organised around local towns and districts, reducing the impact of environmentally damaging car journeys. In Suffolk there is currently an ever expanding membership of over 35,000 with many groups around the county.

Councillor Lisa Chambers, Suffolk County Council’s Portfolio Holder for Waste said;

“The beginning of January is the perfect opportunity for people to get rid of well-meant but unwanted Christmas presents, whilst helping to raise money for charity or simply offering to someone in their local community for free.

"It may not be to your taste or fit properly but the chances are it will be in very good condition and crying out for a new home. It is important that we do everything we can to reduce waste and reuse good quality items rather than send them to landfill.”

For more information consult the Reuse pages on www.suffolkrecycling.org.uk